Friday Update – 10 July 2015

This week I highlight the publication of two reports on the impact of the pupil premium since it was introduced in 2011 and some research carried out the Scouting Association looking at children’s perceptions of their emotional and social skills and their attitudes towards opportunities for extra-curricular activities.

REPORTS ON THE IMPACT OF THE PUPIL PREMIUM
Two important reports have been recently released about the impact of the pupil premium since it was introduced in 2011. These reports, one from the Sutton Trust and the other from the National Audit Office (NAO), are useful in helping Governors to understand the current practical applications and challenges of the pupil premium.

RESEARCH ON CHILDREN’S PERCEPTIONS OF THEIR EMOTIONAL AND SOCIAL SKILLS AND ATTITUDES TOWARDS OPPORTUNITIES FOR EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES
Last week the Scouting Association published research which looked at children’s perceptions of their emotional and social skills and their attitudes towards opportunities for extra-curricular activities. Its report Learning by Doing revealed that many state-school children felt that they didn’t receive the same opportunities for ‘non-formal’ learning than those attending fee-paying schools. Furthermore, those children on free school meals (FSM) were less likely to participate in extra-curricular activities such as sporting, outdoor and volunteering and this in turn, was likely to impact on the attainment of such children.