Secondary performance tables published – Friday 25 January 2019

This week I report on the publication of the secondary performance tables and revised guidance explaining how the secondary school accountability measures are calculated, as well as the Education Secretary’s speech calling for the technology industry and educators to work in partnership to transform education, cut teacher workload and improve pupil outcomes.

Secondary accountability measures and the publication of performance tables
A new secondary school accountability system was introduced in 2016. The DfE has published revised guidance explaining how the measures are calculated and further clarification on the support available to schools falling below the floor or coasting standards, following the Education Secretary’s speech in May 2018, on his vision for a clearer school accountability system. It also follows publication of the Government’s response to the Workload Advisory Group’s recent report Making Data Work.

This week the secondary school performance tables were published and show:

  • attainment results for pupils at the end of Key Stage 4
  • the progress made by pupils between the end of primary school to the end of secondary school
  • data on the performance of disadvantaged pupils
  •  differences in the performance of:
    • pupils who had low attainment at the end of primary school
    • pupils who had high attainment at the end of primary school
    • pupils who were at the expected level at the end of primary school

There is also data about school income and expenditure, the workforce, pupil characteristics and absence.

Education Secretary speech on the technology industry and educators to work in partnership to transform education, cut workload and improve pupil outcomes
On Wednesday, Damian Hinds the Education Secretary, addressed more than 800 of the world’s leading tech companies and start-ups, as well as school representatives and international education ministers, at the Bett Show in London. He told teachers and school leaders to make smarter use of technology, both inside and outside of the classroom, to make sure that it does not add to teachers’ responsibilities. He suggested teachers should not have to email outside of office hours and should instead embrace innovative technology such as AI to help to reduce their workload.

Mr Hinds also outlined his plans to launch an EdTech strategy later this year to harness the power of technology in schools, strengthening the training teachers receive, reducing their workload, and unleashing young people’s potential – backed by a £10 million fund to support innovative uses of tech in schools and colleges across England.